Clever rig fools biggest carp ever caught for TV in UK

Clever rig fools biggest carp ever caught for TV in UK

An England international has caught the biggest carp ever captured on television in this country – using an ingenious rig.

Ryan Need was fishing alongside Rob Hughes at Holme Fen for BT Sport’s On The Bank series when he caught the infamous Captain Jack at 67lb 12oz.

The episode airs at 9pm on Monday (Dec 10, BT Sport 2) and will be available on catch-up services.

Captain Jack was last month denied the British record due to its stocking history.

 England international Ryan Need with Captain Jack at 67lb 12oz

England international Ryan Need with Captain Jack at 67lb 12oz

Fishing next to each other on Party Point at the Cambridgeshire open-access water, Rob and Ryan had nine fish between them including a 46lb 15oz mirror and a 49lb 7oz pb for the former.

 Rob banked himself a pb with this 49lb 7oz mirror

Rob banked himself a pb with this 49lb 7oz mirror

Rob told Carpfeed: “It was an amazing session. The primary reason for being there was to film some winter tips, and to hope to catch a good one. The hope was a 40, and the dream for me was to catch a new pb, which has stood for 15 years.

“From the outset, Ryan was just convinced he was going to catch Captain Jack.

“We were doubled up on Party Point and effectively fishing as a pair as we might for England or in the BCAC.

“Ryan had fished Holme Fen once before and watched Captain Jack feeding in the edge. He said when it came over a rig it would lay on the lead and know that everything below it was unsafe.

“So, the plan we came up with was to fish a very long helicopter rig of 18ins, and that was set like a chod rig another 18ins above the lead – effectively like a big paternoster.

“Casting it was a bit of fun, but we were fishing at 25 wraps [100yds] and had the wind behind us.

“Ryan was convinced – he said ‘this is the rig, it’s definitely going to have it’.

 Ryan’s fish is just ounce short of the current official British record of 68lb 1oz

Ryan’s fish is just ounce short of the current official British record of 68lb 1oz

“On the last morning he had this bite and struck into it, and it was clearly a big fish. We couldn’t see which fish it was but it was kicking up massive swirls, but the thing about that fish is its big old hump which surfaces first. When we saw that we thought it might be, and when we got it in the net and checked its tail we were jumping and screaming!”

The pair fished with maggots and corn, with Ryan adding Mainline boilies and Rob using Dynamite worm CSL liquid and Hit ‘n’ Run boilies. Rob’s fish fell to standard Ronnie rigs.

Rob’s view on whether or not Captain Jack should be a record

“The record list should be exactly that – a paper record of the biggest carp caught in this country. Was it caught on rod and line? Was it in caught in Britain? Was it weighed correctly? If the answer to those three questions is yes, then it should be a record. 

“What if a ‘British’ 40lb fish was moved from one water to another 200 miles away, before growing another 30lb over the following decade. Would that then not be a record?

“It opens up just about all of the previous record fish to question. Take perhaps the most revered record of them all, Mary (caught at a record weight of 56lb in 1996). That fish was moved from another lake into Wraysbury, but at what weight? Over 25 per cent of its final ‘record’ weight?

“We can’t start entertaining this subjective view of credibility from the BRFC, because what’s credible to one man will not be to another. The public give the credibility, not the BRFC, they should just deal with records. 

“And as for the BRFC’s comment about the 150kg of pellets that the fishery is supposed to have fed the lake with each week - that’s just a ridiculous thing to say. Take a busy runs water in the UK, with 50 anglers on for two nights. In high season, each angler might introduce 10kg of pellets, boilies etc per day. That’s 1000kg of bait in just two days, and that’s deemed OK.

“However, if I caught Captain Jack at a ‘record’ weight I wouldn’t claim it as, to me, the biggest fish in Britain was the 83-pounder from Wingham.”