Chod evolution: how to tie the sliding chod

Chod evolution: how to tie the sliding chod
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Literally millions of words have been written about the all-conquering chod rig, yet there are still tweaks to this presentation being made by enterprising anglers that can really make a difference to catches. 

One such enterprising angler is Midlander Matt Rhodes, who agreed to reveal the mechanics of his sliding chod rig to Carpfeed readers.

Easier to tie than a normal chod and arguably a better hooker - what's not to like?

Easier to tie than a normal chod and arguably a better hooker - what's not to like?

The chod is Matt’s go-to pop-up presentation, one that he finds particularly useful when casting at showing fish. 

“I can be confident that the rig is going to be fishing OK as long as I can feel the lead down. It doesn’t matter if I am fishing over chod, silt, gravel, or light weed, the rig chod will still set and present that pop-up well. 

“The only time that it doesn’t work so well is when the weed is thicker. If the lead hits weed on the drop then the chod rig comes off.”

“That said, the chod isn’t without its problems; the most important of which is that it can be prone to fish dropping off during the battle, especially once the fish have been caught a lot on this rig. 

“If you look at the hook holds you get then often the fish will be hooked on the edge of the lips with the chod. This, combined with the ultra-short hooklength and proximity of the lead, can pop the hook out during the fight.

“To combat this problem I tried to look at ways of ensuring that when a carp blows the bait out the hook stays in the mouth and doesn’t follow the pop-up. 

“With a normal chod the buoyant pop-up is easy for the carp to blow out and the hook has to follow and this, I believe, exasperates the hook-hold problems.”

Matt with a sliding-chod-caught mirror

Matt with a sliding-chod-caught mirror

After a lot of tinkering Matt came up with a simple solution to increasing hook and bait separation. 

“I played around with a number of different ideas before settling on the most simple. 

“By attaching the bait to a ring sliding along the chod filament the pop-up can be blown the full length of the rig, giving maximum separation between hook and bait. 

Matt's solution involved further separating the hook and bait

Matt's solution involved further separating the hook and bait

“The improvement in hooking was immediate. 

“This set-up is actually easier to tie than a normal chod, as the chod filament only has to pass through the eye of the hook twice. 

“The pop-up is also closer to the hook, making it easier for the carp to pick up. And as long as a buoyant pop-bait is used it will re-set every time.”

It's easier to tie as there's no D section and the line only goes through the hook eye twice

It's easier to tie as there's no D section and the line only goes through the hook eye twice

A short link is a critical factor with chods according to Matt. 

“The tighter the pop-up is to the deck the less obvious it will appear. 

“I keep mine to a maximum of 2ins, with the chod link only subtly curved. 

“A 15mm Nashbait Coconut Creme airball pop-up is really buoyant and holds up the size 7 hook perfectly.”

Over the last 18 months Matt has taken a number of good fish on his modified chods, but perhaps more interestingly, the rig has caught him a number of bonus fish on slow days or when the carp have apparently shut up shop. 

Matt puts this down to a combination of two factors. 

“I will often get odd single bleeps on my Sirens when fishing normal chods. I am sure this is fish that are only half-heartedly picking up the pop-up and so not hooking themselves. 

“I seem to get less of these moody indications with the sliding version. I think the subtle difference of the sliding chod can also catch the carp out when they are feeding cautiously as when I fish the new and standard versions side-by-side it is invariably the new one that delivers a bite.”

How to tie the sliding chod rig
 

1) Cut off about 8ins of 20lb Chod Link. This is stiff enough to hold a slight curve well and is easy to tie.

2) Thread the Chod Link through the eye of stiff-rigger hook. The slightly upturned eye of the hook is essential for the pop-up to sit in the right position.

3) Tie on the hook using an eight-turn whipping knot. Trim the tag end of the Chod Link and blob it to avoid any chance of the knot slipping.

4) Thread a 4mm rig ring or bait screw onto the Chod Link. If you use a ring then the bait will need to be tied on with dental floss.

5) Tie on a mini-ring swivel using a two-turn blood knot. Wet the knot and tighten it down carefully.

6) Blob the end of the swivel knot to avoid any chance of it slipping.

7) Mould just enough putty to balance your pop-up around the barrel of the ring swivel. Carefully bend the Chod Link into a slight curve.

8) Screw your chosen pop-up onto the bait screw and the rig is ready to go.