CARPHACK: The simplest line marker you'll ever use

CARPHACK: The simplest line marker you'll ever use

These little gizmos from the coarse-angling market are the perfect solution for marking your mainline for accuracy

For more great tips from top anglers head to this year’s The Big One Show

Forget fiddly powergum or slivers of tape, this is so simple

Forget fiddly powergum or slivers of tape, this is so simple

Accuracy can be everything when fishing for big carp.

When fishing at any sort of range, being able to cast your rig accurately over the top of your loosefeed is often central to success.

In this enlightened age, we carp anglers have ‘wrapping sticks’ at our disposal to enable us to do this. These allow us to measure the distance we have cast our spod rod, and then set our main rods at the same distance by marking the line and clipping up.

This is where this month’s crafty little hack comes in, courtesy of top carper Karl White.

We have Karl White to thank for this gem of a tip

We have Karl White to thank for this gem of a tip

Whereas most anglers use pole elastic or insulating tape to mark their lines, Karl shuns both of these; using pole elastic requires the tying of a fiddly four-turn stop knot, whereas insulating tape can not only can slip on the line – meaning you can end up casting nowhere near your loosefeed ­– it also leaves glue all over your line once removed.  

Karl’s answer to the problem is one of those that instantly makes you think ‘that’s brilliant – why didn’t I think of that?’

Step one: place your bait band ‘behind’ the line

Step one: place your bait band ‘behind’ the line

Here’s how he explained it to Carpfeed: “There are specific qualities I look for when marking my lines - ease of application and removal, robust enough not to slip and supple enough not to hinder casting ability.

“A great, underused and cheap solution is the use of bait bands. I use the large latex ones from Gardner Tackle - they come in a very handy little tube which lives in my tackle box.

“To mark the lines, I simply loop the bait band through itself, around the mainline and pull tight. They are quite delicate, but with a bit of practice you will learn the elastic limit.

Step two: pull one end of the band through the other, trapping the line

Step two: pull one end of the band through the other, trapping the line

“They will grip well on mono, fluorocarbon and braid, they are nice and visible in the daytime and glow well in the light of a headtorch during darkness. To remove them, you simply pull tight and they break away.”

They grip tightly on all mainlines, leave no residue and are picked up easily by a headtorch

They grip tightly on all mainlines, leave no residue and are picked up easily by a headtorch

So there you have it, a simple, quick and highly efficient solution to a problem all of us face. As Karl says “No more fiddly stop knots or slipping electrical tape!”